The Chemistry Of Life

compoundchem:

After the graphic which looked at functional groups, here’s one that looks at some of the simpler heterocyclic compounds in organic chemistry.For more information, to download the graphic, and to read the inevitable jokes about arsoles, head here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-oQ

compoundchem:

After the graphic which looked at functional groups, here’s one that looks at some of the simpler heterocyclic compounds in organic chemistry.

For more information, to download the graphic, and to read the inevitable jokes about arsoles, head here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-oQ

(via cyclopentadiene)

compoundchem:

vaelynx:

fuck-liberal-morons:

vaelynx:

fuck-liberal-morons:

redbloodedamerica:

fuck-liberal-morons:

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

That is all 100% bullshit.

According to this I should have died numerous times already.

If that were accurate I would die daily.

This is bullshit.
0.65 litre of 40% spirit is not a lethal dose - plenty people drink lots more than that.

.65L of 200 proof is not a lethal dose to someone used to liquor. And 6L of water? Hell… They tell you to drink that every day.

Not quite every day, but there are plenty days when I have drunk 6 litres or so, mainly because it was summer and I sweat like a fucking horse when doing stuff like cleaning goat sheds.

I’m going to do this one more time, because I think it’s important to stop people getting the wrong end of the stick. Or, in some cases, the wrong stick. This information is right there, on the graphic, but I clearly should have put it in bigger letters or something, because it keeps getting missed!Firstly: the LD50 value is for a dose taken all at once. Not over day, or several hours, but all in one go. Secondly, it’s the value at which you’d have a 50% chance of death. Some people could drink more than this and live; conversely, some could drink less than this and die. The figures are also for a person of average weight (75kg), and in reality physical and medical conditions are also factors.For alcohol, this is the calculated value, for the alcohol content specified (40% alcohol, 45ml shots). Personal drinking history, whether or not you’re drinking on an empty stomach, and physical/medical condition can all affect this value.
There are documented cases of water poisoning (and death from it) at roughly this amount. There are also accounts of deaths from alcohol after drinking less than the amount featured here in one go.
The post that accompanies the graphic goes into lots more detail about median lethal doses, and I’d highly recommend reading it!

compoundchem:

vaelynx:

fuck-liberal-morons:

vaelynx:

fuck-liberal-morons:

redbloodedamerica:

fuck-liberal-morons:

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

That is all 100% bullshit.

According to this I should have died numerous times already.

If that were accurate I would die daily.

This is bullshit.

0.65 litre of 40% spirit is not a lethal dose - plenty people drink lots more than that.

.65L of 200 proof is not a lethal dose to someone used to liquor. And 6L of water? Hell… They tell you to drink that every day.

Not quite every day, but there are plenty days when I have drunk 6 litres or so, mainly because it was summer and I sweat like a fucking horse when doing stuff like cleaning goat sheds.

I’m going to do this one more time, because I think it’s important to stop people getting the wrong end of the stick. Or, in some cases, the wrong stick. This information is right there, on the graphic, but I clearly should have put it in bigger letters or something, because it keeps getting missed!

Firstly: the LD50 value is for a dose taken all at once. Not over day, or several hours, but all in one go. Secondly, it’s the value at which you’d have a 50% chance of death. Some people could drink more than this and live; conversely, some could drink less than this and die. The figures are also for a person of average weight (75kg), and in reality physical and medical conditions are also factors.

For alcohol, this is the calculated value, for the alcohol content specified (40% alcohol, 45ml shots). Personal drinking history, whether or not you’re drinking on an empty stomach, and physical/medical condition can all affect this value.

There are documented cases of water poisoning (and death from it) at roughly this amount. There are also accounts of deaths from alcohol after drinking less than the amount featured here in one go.

The post that accompanies the graphic goes into lots more detail about median lethal doses, and I’d highly recommend reading it!

dimethylsulfoxide:

Nice colors from my last separation (ether in the organic layer, copper sulfate as the inorganic)

(via cyclopentadiene)

holymoleculesbatman:

Tea lovers! This molecule is called Theanine.
It is commonly found in tea, primarily in green tea. Able to cross the blood-brain barrier, Theanine has psychoactive properties. Theanine has been shown to reduce mental and physical stress, and improves cognition and mood in a synergistic manner with caffeine.

holymoleculesbatman:

Tea lovers! This molecule is called Theanine.

It is commonly found in tea, primarily in green tea. Able to cross the blood-brain barrier, Theanine has psychoactive properties. Theanine has been shown to reduce mental and physical stress, and improves cognition and mood in a synergistic manner with caffeine.

(via darnissist)

thelabrat1990:

Some of my favorite copper compounds (all synthesized from copper metal). From left to right: copper (II) carbonate, copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate, anhydrous copper (II) acetate, copper (II) chloride dihydrate, and anhydrous copper (II) chloride.

thelabrat1990:

Some of my favorite copper compounds (all synthesized from copper metal). From left to right: copper (II) carbonate, copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate, anhydrous copper (II) acetate, copper (II) chloride dihydrate, and anhydrous copper (II) chloride.

(via chroniclesofachemist)

labphoto:

Trying to crystallize a compound from ethyl-acetate/cycohexane solvent mixture. 
The optimal concentration of cyclohexane (50%) was in the third test tube, where most of the compound crystallized out.

labphoto:

Trying to crystallize a compound from ethyl-acetate/cycohexane solvent mixture. 

The optimal concentration of cyclohexane (50%) was in the third test tube, where most of the compound crystallized out.

I understand science! Physics is maths, biology is history, and chemistry is magic!

compoundchem:

If, like me, you’re currently suffering from the joys of hay fever, you might be interested in learning a little about the chemicals behind its cause and treatment. Read more about them here.

compoundchem:

If, like me, you’re currently suffering from the joys of hay fever, you might be interested in learning a little about the chemicals behind its cause and treatment. Read more about them here.